Volume 5, Issue 2, December 2020, Page: 19-23
Subjective vs. Objective Urine Color: Effect of Hydration Status
Tory Edwards, School of Exercise and Nutritional Sciences, San Diego State University, San Diego, the United States
Rebekah Belasco, School of Exercise and Nutritional Sciences, San Diego State University, San Diego, the United States
Alfonso Joaquin Munoz, School of Exercise and Nutritional Sciences, San Diego State University, San Diego, the United States
Vernon Rayo, School of Exercise and Nutritional Sciences, San Diego State University, San Diego, the United States
Michael Buono, School of Exercise and Nutritional Sciences, San Diego State University, San Diego, the United States
Received: Aug. 5, 2020;       Accepted: Aug. 24, 2020;       Published: Sep. 3, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.aap.20200502.12      View  22      Downloads  6
Abstract
Purpose: To investigate the validity of urine color as a metric of hydration status using CIE L*a*b* color space, as compared to the commonly used subjective 8-point scale. Methods: A total of 151 urine samples were collected from subjects (N=28) in various states of hydration. Urine osmolality and urine specific gravity (USG) were measured in each sample. Urine color was assessed by the subjective 8-point urine color scale and quantified using CIE L*a*b* color space. RESULTS: The correlation between the CIE b*-value and urine osmolality (rs=0.89) was determined to be significantly (p=0.004) greater than the correlation between the subjective 8-point urine color scale and urine osmolality (rs=0.85). The correlation between the CIE b*-value and USG (rs=0.90) was also determined to be significantly (p < 0.001) greater than the correlation between the urine color chart and USG (rs=0.84). Lastly, the correlation between urine color as determined by the 8-point subjective urine color chart and the CIE b*-value had a strong relationship (rs=0.92). Conclusions: The correlations of the quantitative CIE b*-value with urine osmolality and USG were significantly greater than the correlations with the 8-point subjective urine color scale. This suggests that a quantitative measurement of urine color via spectrophotometry is a better measure for assessing hydration status vs. subjective determination of urine color. The results of the current study raise the possibility of spectrophotometry as an additional non-invasive method of determining hydration status.
Keywords
Urine Color, Urine Osmolality, CIE L*a*b* Color Space, Dehydration
To cite this article
Tory Edwards, Rebekah Belasco, Alfonso Joaquin Munoz, Vernon Rayo, Michael Buono, Subjective vs. Objective Urine Color: Effect of Hydration Status, Advances in Applied Physiology. Vol. 5, No. 2, 2020, pp. 19-23. doi: 10.11648/j.aap.20200502.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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